Red Shoes

impressions of my red shoes

1,505 notes &

skunkbear:

Thanks to the hundreds of people who sent me their photos of the lunar eclipse! I used a lot of the photos (though not all — I’ve received a lot more since I put this together) to make this cross-country 20 fps time lapse. (It’s a big GIF so you might have to wait for it to load…)

The title card comes from Max Corneau (aka AstroDad) who camped out in Rockwall, TX and managed to get this terrific shot at totality before the clouds closed in.

Ron Pope in Abilene, TX caught a very spooky shot of the October moon rising from the mist.

I love the “moon bounce" images that Brittney Maehl sent me from Beloit, WI. She told me: “Trying to capture the Blood Moon as an amateur WITHOUT a tripod was like making the ultimate sniper shot!” Luckily she was Navy-trained, so she got some great steady shots as well that I included in the time lapse.

The last shot is from flickr user slworking2. He says, “I used the tracking mount from an old telescope to follow the moon - and this allowed for a sharply-focused exposure.”

It was wonderful to get your photos (there were so many cool ones I couldn’t highlight specifically) and to hear your stories of blood moon hunting. Thanks again!

ICYMI: Why are blood moons red, anyway?

(via npr)

363 notes &

nprglobalhealth:

In Plain Sight: The Sorrow And Pain Of Global Girls

Today is the International Day of the Girl Child. It is a U.N. event with a grand name and a powerful mission. Girls around the world, especially in lower-income countries, often face terrible things, from genital mutilation to child marriage to kidnapping. We asked five photographers, who devote much or all of their time to documenting the lives of global girls, to share photos with special significance and talk about the images.

Top photo: Nine months pregnant, Niruta, who is 14, arrives at her wedding in Kagati Village, Kathmandu Valley, Nepal on Jan. 23, 2007. Niruta moved in with the family of her 17-year-old husband-to-be and became pregnant when they were engaged — considered acceptable in her society. (Courtesy of Stephanie Sinclair)

Bottom photos: Sheldean Human of Pretoria, South Africa, was 7 when she was murdered, then raped, by a stranger in 2007. Furrer photographed her schoolmates: “These two girls represent a situation of incredible pain and loss but they are just so dignified. It breaks my heart.” (Mariella Furrer)

See more and read what the photographers had to say.

Related: A Day For Global Girls Gets People Talking, But Then What?

554 notes &

npr:

We’ve had a great response to the #nprcensus assignment! Here are a couple of our favorites so far. 

There’s still time to participate in this #newboom project. Calling all millennials (ages 18-34) — we want your selfies! Write on a mirror or hold up a sign with your Census categories on one side and your preferred categories on the other. Tag it #nprcensus and you might see your submission on NPR.org or NPR social media channels.

Photo credits: @ecila_z@nadijams, @sscottie@reveles@msphillockwood

71 notes &

nprbooks:

My awesome nerd buddy Mallory Yu takes a look at the difficulties faced by women in comics — yes, the new Thor may be a woman (and women in general have made great strides) but we still face a lot of discrimination and harassment, just for making, loving and critiquing comics.

Marvel’s Jeanine Schaefer believes this behavior is partly driven by extreme fear on the part of some comics fans.
"There’s this perception that, ‘Well, if we let women in, then everything is going to change. They’re going to take away everything that I like about comics,’" Schaefer says.
And Schaefer hopes that bringing more women and diverse voices into the creative process will prove to those fans that their favorite stories will only be enhanced by the different perspectives.
[Janelle] Asselin says the level of vitriol some fans aim at women working in or commenting on the comics industry is “not an OK way to treat people,” no matter the reason, but she thinks it can and will get better. These fans just need to accept that women aren’t going to leave the comics world.
After all, a genre where the unlikeliest of misfits can be heroes should have the best variety of voices to tell those stories.

Read the rest here!
— Petra

nprbooks:

My awesome nerd buddy Mallory Yu takes a look at the difficulties faced by women in comics — yes, the new Thor may be a woman (and women in general have made great strides) but we still face a lot of discrimination and harassment, just for making, loving and critiquing comics.

Marvel’s Jeanine Schaefer believes this behavior is partly driven by extreme fear on the part of some comics fans.

"There’s this perception that, ‘Well, if we let women in, then everything is going to change. They’re going to take away everything that I like about comics,’" Schaefer says.

And Schaefer hopes that bringing more women and diverse voices into the creative process will prove to those fans that their favorite stories will only be enhanced by the different perspectives.

[Janelle] Asselin says the level of vitriol some fans aim at women working in or commenting on the comics industry is “not an OK way to treat people,” no matter the reason, but she thinks it can and will get better. These fans just need to accept that women aren’t going to leave the comics world.

After all, a genre where the unlikeliest of misfits can be heroes should have the best variety of voices to tell those stories.

Read the rest here!

— Petra